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CPSIA Testing

On 14 August 2008, President George W. Bush signed landmark legislation: the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008. The Act has stated rules that define lead limits and phthalates specifically for juvenile products and requires that testing for certain juvenile products be completed and documented by accredited Third Party Testing Labs before these products may be imported to the USA.

On October 18, 2017, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) issued a final rule prohibiting children’s toys and child care articles containing more than 0.1 percent of certain phthalate chemicals.

The details are as follows:

Our lab has been accredited by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to test toys and children’s products based on CPSC regulations as follows:

  • Lead Paint: 16 CFR Part 1303
  • Pacifiers: 16 CFR Part 1511
  • Small Parts Rule: 16 CFR Part 1501
  • Textile flammability test: 16 CFR Part 1610
  • Rattle-drum: 16 CFR Part 1510
  • Lead in Children’s Metal Jewelry: CPSC-CH-E1001-08
  • Lead in Children’s Metal Products: CPSC-CH-E1001-08
  • Lead in Children’s Non-Metal Products: CPSC-CH-E1002-08
  • ASTM F963-17

Issues and resolutions

  • Lead limit
  • Phthalate limit
  • Mandatory toy safety standard ASTM F963
  • Third party testing requirement
  • Tracking labels for children’s products
  • GCC (General Conformity Certification)

Events

  • Tue
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    May
    2018
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    May
    2018

    HQTS is pleased to announce we will exhibit at the China Commodity Fair, Moscow. We invite you to drop by and learn more about how HQTS can help you meet your quality assurance goals. You can find us …

News

  • Canada Approved Children’s Jewellery Regulations (SOR/2018-82)

    On 2nd May 2018, Canada’s Department of Health has published SOR/2018-82 Children’s Jewelry Regulations, which shall repeal SOR/2016-168 Children’s Jewelry Regulations. All the proposed provisions have been approved, and shall come into force on 2 November 2018.